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Di Sainbod Filosofi

bai Edwin Eriata Oribhabor

Regular readers of this column should by now, be familiar with spellings in Naija as used on this page. This niu spelin sistem was packaged by Naija Langwej Akedemi in collaboration with Institut Francais de Recherche en Afrique au Nigeria (IFRA-NG) code-named Standad Naija Otografi (SNO.) This autography has guided all spellings used in the promotion of Naija (aka Nigeria Pidgin) For example, if the above title was written in normal English language, it would read; Signboard Philosophy or Philosophy of the signboard. By the way, the average Nigerians regard billboards as signboards bikos na niu wod . In whatever name you choose to call it, let’s talk about hau di tin don skata som pipul hed fo Naija.

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TEXT MI FO NAIJA

bai Edwin Eriata Oribhabor

In the world of GSM, the use of text messages is key for its brevity, clarity, timeliness in delivery and cost. Millions of text messages flai from ples to ples every minute. At peak periods, they jam demsef and sometimes put the networks at great risks of crashing. At yuletides, if you say “festive time” to no one in particular, you are most likely going to hear “texting time” just like in Churches all over Nigeria, where the shout of “offering time” by a “Man-of-God” is usually greeted with “blessing time” by members of the congregation. Considering our knack for spending quality time and resources on both phone calls and text messages, nobodi go tel yu se ol di GSM kompini dem fo Naija jos de hama. These days, it is fast becoming a ritual of some sort to have millions of Nigerians usher every new month with prayers and good wishes transmitted in all manner of text messages.

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SAILENT BOMB

bai Edwin Eriata Oribhabor

In times like this, one needs to think deeply before putting pen to paper to write on any sensitive matter; let alone bomb. Still fresh on one’s mind were the October, 1st Independence Day - celebration bomb blast and that of New Year Eve at the Mogadishu Barracks in Abuja last year. Sounds unbelievable bikos wi no sabi dis kain bomb bomb mata. Like millions of Nigerians, mi sef de wonda hau pesin go tink so te, na hau to yuz bomb finish anoda pesin laif. Apart from the Nigerian Civil War where awa oun ogbunigwe and all sorts of bombs were freely used, the recent Niger Delta war of the militants and the destruction of Odi and Zaki Biam respectively, no bi awa stail to bomb awasef. Ivun mi, kpakpa, I have never had the “privilege” of seeing what a bomb looks like. Wetin konsain manpikin wit bomb?

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WARRI: TOKU TOKU AN WODIN NA “FOOD”

bai Edwin Eriata Oribhabor

I have always wanted to write something about the people of Warri with particular emphasis on their “habit” and style of toku toku. By the people of Warri, I mean all, irrespective of tribal affiliation, that may have lived or are still living in the place, largely influenced by both the place and the prevalent speaking style and capacity to seamlessly act out the “characteristics” of a true Waferian. My interest lies in unravelling the reason (s) for this, as well as the popular saying; “Warri no de kari last”. For the benefit of those who may not be familiar with the word toku toku, it is used to describe anyone that talks a lot. How come a people are widely known and liked for their “habit” and style of talking? Are they putting this act into positive uses or na jos to tok pra pra pra fo notin? What about the phrase; “Warri no de kari last?” that speaks of the confidence of the average Warri pesin; known for his/her unique efforts in confronting every situation no matter the odds, likened to the saying; “As the going gets tough, the Tough gets going.”

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TATAFO WITAUT WAYA

bai Edwin Eriata Oribhabor

One of 2010’s landmark events was Julian Paul Assange’s publication of secret diplomatic US government cables on WikiLeaks, his whistle blowing website-company. Na hu bi dis man sef?

Julian Paul Assange, born 3 July 1971, is an Australian publisher, journalist, software developer and Internet activist. Assange has worked as a computer programmer and was a hacker during his youth. He has lived in several countries, and has made public appearances in many parts of the world to speak about freedom of the press, censorship, and investigative journalism.

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ABEG, TOTORI YO SEF

bai Edwin Eriata Oribhabor

There’s hardly a day that goes by without somebody pleading for something, somewhere. It is vital for the soft-landing of any request. No matter the reason behind it or the style in which it is broached, pleading is strategic to any harmonious relationship.

When one says abeg in Naija, one is simply saying, “please” as used in the English language. Drawn from the word “beg”, it is a polite way of asking for something. For example should one ask for money from another person by saying abeg giv mi kudi or pepe, it is the same as, “please give me some money.” Similarly, in a request for assistance, one could say abeg mek yu help mi fo wetin wi tok, meaning, “please help me out with what we discussed”.

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MAI PIPUL SE…

bai Edwin Eriata Oribhabor

No bi se man pikin no go fit de trowe yans fo una fo Naija. No bi se man no nou se Naija na di langwej we ol of os don sidon taya de wet, to si hau di levul go chenj fo beta. Tru tru Naija na di veri levul bot wen wi kom hie di won we madam Nafdak bifo bifo de yan, wi go nou se i don mash lain. Na im wi jos trowe fes fo Riva Naija bikos di tin don bi laik agbada we hang fo tri. Wi sabi se Naija na hau wi de, na hau wi de ron tins, na awa nashonal langwej. Naija na somtin we don pas di bottom of di rut we oyibo de kol tap rut. Naija na wetin ol of os want fo awa sef, fo ol of os an fo wi ol. As di tin kom bi laik dis, plenti pipul de se mek a de yan fo Naija. Dem se na fo onli laik dis dem go tek si ol di waka we Naija don de waka. Wen mai pipul don tok, hu bi mi to se a no go ansa. Na im bring dis arenjment fo propa Naija we una de rid so.

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NAIJA: A MAJOR FORCE IN REBRANDING – 2

bai Edwin Eriata Oribhabor

The Ministerial “ban” on the use of Naija sounds more of an “order from above”. Most of such orders hardly stand the test of time. I have tried to rationalize it with the phrase Warri no de kari last now popularized by Comedians. Although associated with “Waferians”, it is now common to hear people say Naija no de kari last meaning, Nigeria would always triumph. I cannot imagine an elected governor of Delta State pass an order to ban the use of the use of Warri no de kari last in Warri or anywhere in Delta State. Should he embark on such a delicate ride, his opponents who appreciate its importance may use it against him. If you say he would lose the next election as a result of this hori hori oda, you may not be far from the truth. Whenever a “Waferian” finds his/herself in any difficult situation, he says Warri no de kari last and takes a brief time to reflect on a way out. A new approach and thinking of the way forward is compulsorily drawn form a latent or hidden energy to surmount whatever the challenge may be. Warri no de kari last is the same as Naija no de kari last and in the same category with such powerful shout of comradeship/identification like Igbo kwenu. Just imagine an Igbo Chief, Eze, or King ordering his people to stop using Igbo Kwenu which is more than just a shout or whatever. Naija is more than a nomenclature and should be treated as such.

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